The DASH minor and certificates emerged from a tradition of collaborative research in the Humanities Digital Workshop.  Faculty and students work together closely, trying new techniques, proposing new approaches.  As projects develop, faculty and students find themselves in need of new technical skills and analytic approaches: the DASH curriculum emerged in response to those project-driven needs.

The HDW is the hub for computationally-assisted research in the Humanities at Washington University.  The HDW welcomes new faculty projects in the Humanities and interpretive and social sciences; currently it supports projects in English Literature, American Studies, Chinese History, African-American Studies, German, Hispanic Studies, Comparative Literature, and Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies.

Novel ™: Matthew Erlin, PI

The Spenser Project: Joseph Loewenstein, PI

The Gender Violence Database: Jami Ake, PI

 

The Jane Eyre Effect: Lynne Tatlock, PI

Early Print: Anupam Basu, PI

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A few projects have been running for several years:

The Gender Violence Database: Jami Ake, PI

The Spenser Project: Joseph Loewenstein, PI

Creating a Federal Government: Peter Kastor, PI

Novel ™: Matthew Erlin, PI

The Jane Eyre Effect: Lynne Tatlock, PI

Early Print: Anupam Basu, PI

A few projects are relatively new:

America as “A City on a Hill”: Abram Van Engen, PI

Holocaust Geographies: Anika Walke, PI

Meters of Greek Drama: Timothy Moore, PI

The Rhythms of Latin Prose: Tom Keeline, PI

Geographies of American Racial Violence: Geoffrey Ward, PI

Hope Mirlees’ Paris: Melanie Micir, OI

Street Theatricality in Latin American: William Acree, PI

The Social Network of Xie Lansheng: Steven Miles, PI

More information on HDW projects is available here.